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Posts Tagged ‘Startups’

110 Startup Marketing: Viviana Faga Emergence Capital

110 Startup Marketing: Viviana Faga Emergence Capital

We have another riveting and insightful episode today with Viviana Faga, Operating Partner at Emergence Capital. She is in-charge of marketing and helped create over 150B in new market cap. Today she shares some of her amazing experiences working both with startups and VCs.

The Importance of Marketing

Viviana Faga worked in Senior Marketing roles with companies like Salesforce.com and Zoom Communications. She was the Head of Marketing at Yammer and pioneered the enterprise social space.

At the moment, she coaches CEOs and Founders and leads them in finding the importance of marketing in scaling their businesses.

“You just got $5-15M and you’re thinking, ‘where do I want to spend my money? I want to spend money on building my product and I don’t know who to hire? Why should I hire a marketer? It just seems like one big massive waste.’ That’s what I deal with and those are the kind of questions that I get everyday.” – Viviana Faga

The Best Doesn’t Always Win

Viv narrates her current client who has a great product, but is currently in a category that his competition built. Viv find it fascinating to explain that the best products doesn’t always win. If a CEO doesn’t believe in this, the CEO then finds himself in a never ending cycle of “catch-up.”

“There are plenty of cases where it does. The company just sort of takes off, without great marketing. We’ve seen that. But for the most part, in the competitive market, if you don’t define the category, if you don’t create it, you’re going to really struggle because now you’re gonna look like you’re playing catch up.” – Viviana Faga

Viv advises her clients that the company will never be able to catch up if they continue copying the competition’s message.

“You have to change the game. Come up with completely new messaging. You have to go so hard at writing that message ⁠— from your press releases, website and sales collateral. Every single piece of content that is external facing has to speak this new language.” – Viviana Faga

CEOs Who Listen 

Viviana was proud to say that she embedded herself into her client’s company. Other than this, she believes that she can only help those who are willing to listen. She narrated how she turned down the CEO of Yammer, twice.

“It was hard to turn him down, but obviously he convinced me. I wanted to work for a CEO who understood the value of marketing and after that conversation, I wasn’t so sure but a lot of folks from Salesforce have gone there. It’s our job to convince him Sales & Marketing matter.” – Viviana Faga

To hear more about  Startup Marketing: Viviana Faga Emergence Capital and more relevant information about Viviana Faga, download and listen to the episode.

Bio:

Viviana brings over fifteen years of experience designing and building brand categories for successful cloud/SaaS and enterprise social companies, helping them create scalable growth engines that drive successful exits.

Her particular passions are scaling and structuring go-to-market SaaS teams, messaging and positioning, category creation, freemium product strategy, and sales enablement.

Before joining Emergence, Viviana served as VP of marketing for Yammer, where she defined the enterprise social category. After Yammer’s $1.2B acquisition by Microsoft, she became its head of marketing for enterprise social, which included Office 365, Skype, and Lync. She also spent over six years at Salesforce, where she launched several key product initiatives. Additionally, she was the VP of marketing for Platfora (now Workday) and the CMO of Zenefits.

Links:

Emergence Capital – Viviana Faga

Linkedin – Viviana Faga

Twitter – Viv Faga

103 The Power of an IPO with Eric Yuen

011 The Perception of your product is your product

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Follow Your Different™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! Get amazing, different stories on business, marketing, and life. Subscribe to our newsletter The Difference.

020 The Power of Podcast Guesting w/Tom Schwab, CEO of Interview Valet

020 The Power Podcast Guesting w/Tom Schwab, CEO of Interview Valet

From time to time, we will bring on guests to go deep on a topic in a particular field. Today’s guest is Tom Schwab, founder of Interview Valet. As we celebrate International Podcast Day, we will discuss the power of podcast guesting and why it is a strategic component of legendary marketing today.

Connecting with People

Tom stresses the importance of podcast guesting, especially for business executives, authors, and entrepreneurs. He believes exposure brings opportunity and podcast guesting is one of the most intimate and targeted ways for customers to know somebody.

“I love podcasts because its a way to really connect with people. You’re not yelling, you’re talking with them. They’re choosing to listen to you.” – Tom Schwab

Mainstream Media vs. Podcasting

Tom discusses how powerful podcasting. He says it should be a major part of one’s content strategy. In mainstream media, aside from the cost to advertise (television, print, and radio), one acquires a limited time and limited space, unlike in podcast guesting, where it reaches hundreds of thousands, overtime.

“You’re tapping into an audience, getting that like and trust, getting introduced by someone,  they already know. The other thing too is, if you do a live speech, it’s really hard to repurpose that content. If you do a podcast interview, you can do the transcript to make blogs.” – Tom Schwab

Christopher agrees with Tom, as he speaks based on experience. He mentions how he appears on different mainstream media and only get to share a portion of his thoughts for a few seconds.

“Podcast interview is an easy and scalable way to really go deeper. People will understand you and what really drove you, why you got into the business. People should know they could like and trust you. That’s really hard to do in a 30 sec clip or a little Facebook ad.”  – Tom Schwab

The Golden Age of Podcasting

Tom cites Harvard University and the conference that they organized last year on podcasting. They call this time as the Golden Age of Podcasting and there is never the best time to explore podcast advertising other than at the present time.

Christopher also shares that there is a lot of whitespace opportunity in podcasting. He believes that there is a high value for sponsors because podcasts provide a high level of intimacy in terms of getting to know the guests through a conversation.

“I think today, brands want to know the heart behind it. Those people that can get out there early and explain that, not in an ad but in an actual conversation. To me, that’s where you can really build up a lifetime value of a customer.” – Tom Schwab

To hear more about the power of podcast guesting and more relevant information from Tom Schwab, download and listen to the episode.

Bio:

Tom Schwab knows how to build an online business.

He’s done it successfully several times and now helps others find online success with podcast interview marketing.

Marketing at its heart is starting a conversation with someone who could be an ideal customer.

Tom helps thought leaders (coaches, authors, speakers, consultants, emerging brands) get featured on leading podcasts their ideal prospects are already listening to. The Interview Valet system then helps them to turn listeners into customers.

The author of Podcast Guest Profits: Grow Your Business with a Targeted Interview Strategy, Tom is also Founder/CEO of Interview Valet, the category king of Podcast Interview Marketing.

Links:

Linkedin – Thomas Schwab

Interview Valet

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content.

051 Should I Start a Business?

Should I Start a Business? Follow Your Different™ Podcast

On today’s special episode, Christopher answers a question from a young woman who wants to know whether she should start a business. He touches on two points: the effect of formal education on entrepreneurial success and the distinction between missionaries and mercenaries.

Entrepreneurship is Not for Everybody

Christopher received an email from a 20-year-old woman thinking about leaving school to starting a business. Perhaps inspired by his own story, she sought out his help.

With very few options after getting thrown out of school at 18, Christopher started a business. Entrepreneurship was a way out of a life of struggle for him. However, even a huge proponent of entrepreneurship like Christopher thinks it is not the answer for everybody.

“It’s an interesting thing that for many entrepreneurs, entrepreneurship is the only root that we have.” – Christopher Lochhead

Education Remains Valid for Most

The first thing that you should ask yourself when you consider quitting school to start a business is whether you are really ready. True, a lot has been said about success after dropping out and how college is slowly dying.

But according to the Kauffman Foundation, adults without formal education are much less likely to be entrepreneurs than their educated counterparts. Research also shows that the more educated you are, the more you are going to make. While the media portrays lots of dropout-turned-rockstar tales, the truth is that most entrepreneurs get some education.

“This is coming from a guy who didn’t go to school. but I think you need to think twice before dropping out because for most people, school pays off.” – Christopher Lochhead

Are You on a Mission?

Another question to ask: are you a missionary or a mercenary? Christopher’s buddy Eddie Yoon makes this very important distinction. If you are the latter, then you are going to tap out when it gets hard.

There will be massive losery along the way and the disappointments will be huge. Things that will make you want to quit will happen on a fairly regular basis. Being mission-driven, like what most top VCs dub successful entrepreneurs, is the way to charge forward.

“Your commitment to the mission is what will get you through the hard parts. And there will be hard parts and the hard parts will be way worse than anybody ever expressed to you.” – Christopher Lochhead

To hear more about Christopher’s take on whether you should start a business, download and listen to the episode. Got a question for Christopher? Email him at blackhole@lochhead.com.

Link:

Quora – What would be your advice for a 21-year-old starting a company?

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Follow Your Different™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!

047 B2B Enterprise Tech On Fire with Christopher Lochhead

B2B Enterprise Tech On Fire with Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™ Podcast

On this episode, Lochhead shares some of the amazing things going on in the enterprise tech industry.

Enterprise Tech on the Rise

Back in 2012, the legendary venture capitalist Jim Goetz of Sequoia made a declaration that tech entrepreneurs were too focused on the consumer world and have ignored the $500-billion market opportunity, which is the enterprise space. Soon after, the Cloud went bigtime—the tipping point for a lot of big innovations. 

Bob Evans of the awesome podcast Cloud Wars said that for Q1 of 2019, Microsoft, Amazon and IBM will combine for $23 billion in Cloud revenue.

“Twice as many enterprise startups have become billion-dollar companies compared to consumer startups.” – Jim Goetz, Senior Partner Sequoia Capital

The Golden Age

Over the last 10 years, there has been an acceleration of innovation. According to Lochhead, this is the greatest time in history to be in the tech industry and particularly in the tech enterprise industry.

“The enterprise space is—if you’re willing to dig it out, if you’re willing to work hard on it and be smart—it’s less binary than the consumer space. With grit, some intelligence, some great technology and some category design, you can really make something of yourself.”  – Christopher Lochhead

Enterprise vs Consumer Tech Companies

Rolfe Winkler, the author of the article, The Tech IPO Delivering the Most for Investors, points out that enterprise companies produced a median of 126% stock growth, compared to a median of 15% increase for consumer tech companies. 

Consumer tech is a hit business, but it is hard to predict in a way that enterprise tech is not. Christopher also thinks that it’s getting tougher to find new niches in the consumer side and startups are afraid of the big players.

“Consumer-focused businesses may have more cachet, but technology startups that cater to companies are what is really hot.” – Rolfe Winkler, The Wall Street Journal

To hear more about the dynamic enterprise tech industry download and listen to this episode.

Bio:

Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Best Selling Amazon Author and “Top 30” rated Podcaster. He is a former 3 time public company Chief Marketing Officer in the enterprise technology business where he spent more than 2/3 of his career. He’s been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “Off-putting to some” by The Economist.

He co-authored two best seller books:

Niche Down: How To Become Legendary By Being Different 

Play Bigger: How Pirates, Dreamers, and Innovators Create and Dominate Markets.

Links:

Lochhead.com

Twitter

LinkedIn

Quora.com

Instagram

Links for Articles and Data Sources:

“As Cloud Market Roars, Microsoft, Amazon and IBM Will Total $23 Billion in Q1 Cloud Revenue”

WSJ Article

Pitchbook

Jeff Richards Episode

Eric Yuan Episode

Vineet Jain Episode

1 Life Fully Lived Conference

We hope you enjoyed Christopher Lochhead on this episode of Follow Your Different™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!

016 Startup Founders Mental Health

Startup Founders Mental Health Follow Your Different™ Podcast

 

On today’s episode, Christopher talks about a relevant TechCrunch article on startup founders mental health written by Jake Chapman. He also shares how he’s able to go through his own mental health concerns.

“Just like we can proactively design our life and our business, we can proactively design our mental health.” – Christopher Lochhead

Entrepreneurs and Founders: Mental Health

In a study by Michael Freeman, it is said that 50% of entrepreneurs are susceptible to a mental health condition. Some specific conditions are prevalent among young startup founders. These include depression, ADHD, substance abuse, bipolar disorder, psychiatric hospitalization, and suicidal thoughts.

Indeed, Aristotle once said that there’s no great genius without a touch of madness. While some of the wacky can help a person be creative, it’s also quite hard to deal with. To address this, there first needs to be mental health awareness within ourselves and also in our entrepreneurial leaders.

“The second thing I tried to do is to create a structure for myself and for my life that acknowledges who I am.” – Christopher Lochhead

Becoming Self-Aware

Christopher has personally gone through a lot of training and therapy to become a self-actualized person. He trained himself to increase his self-awareness. He used his own intelligence to manage his emotions and prevent them from getting the best of him.

“Even if I’m feeling really shitty, at least in some level, I know that this is an overreaction and that this, too, will pass.” – Christopher Lochhead

Getting Help from People

He also surrounds himself with people who know and love him for who he is. When he’s in a dark place, they know how to support him and love him through it. Most importantly, they know when to stop putting up with it and give him a nudge whenever he wallows in his self-pity for too long.

Professional help, of course, is always an option and nothing to be ashamed of.

To hear Christopher Lochhead share more insights into mental health, download and listen to the episode.

Links:

Investors and entrepreneurs need to address the mental health crisis in startups

Entrepreneurs Touched with Fire

Suicide Prevention Lifeline Chat

Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Follow Your Different™ on Startup Founders Mental Health! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!

223 Questions and Cocktails 1st Time Startup CEO

Questions and Cocktails 1st Time Startup CEO Legends and Losers

On this episode of Questions and Cocktails, Christopher Lochhead responds to another question emailed by one his listeners. A 1st time startup CEO for a new venture-backed company seeks advice on how to become a legendary leader.

“Legendary people build legendary companies. It’s that simple.” – Christopher Lochhead 1st Startup Time CEO

Love the Problem, Not Just the Solution

Christopher breaks down his advice into seven points and the first of which is to love the problem. The most legendary of entrepreneurs make it a point to focus on either a problem that people don’t know they have or re-imagining a problem the market knows it has, viewing the problem in a completely different way.

Prosecute the “Magic Triangle” as a 1st Time Startup CEO

Christopher and his co-authors addressed the concept in both Play Bigger and Niche Down. The “magic triangle” is the three things legendary executive teams and entrepreneurs get right. These three are product, company and category, and all are equally important.

As a CEO, you must be focused on all three while at the same time being an evangelist for the problem. The bigger the problem, the more urgent and more strategic you have to be since people will apply more money and time to solve that problem. And in turn, these problems create categories, the product and company intertwined.

Surround Yourself with Legendary People

For years, Christopher parroted the prevalent notion in Silicon Valley that you must always hire A players. But the truth is you will never have a company full of them. This means a CEO must figure out where to put the A players and B players to bring out their best.

A good B player is what you need for a lot of roles that must be fulfilled. But in key executive roles, whether in engineering, sales, or marketing and especially in the beginning, you need legendary people to fill in these roles. In this regard, think about who your board is and who your advisers.

To hear the other four points Christopher offers, download and listen to the episode!

We hope you enjoyed Questions and Cocktails 1st Time Startup CEO! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!

206: Joe Morgan Former CEO of Sony Chemical on Leading, Life, Business & More

Joe Morgan Former CEO of Sony Chemical on Leading, Life, Business & More Legends and Losers

How do you mold a legendary career from curiosity and hard work? Today, Fortune 500 executive turned advisor and mentor Joe Morgan joins Christopher Lochhead in this free-ranging conversation. They talk about leadership, being a CEO, the power of curiosity, and so much more.

“In the microcosm of the world, because we’ve tried hard and we participated, I think we can leave a legend.” – Joe Morgan

Three Things We Learned

Buying is an Awesome Job

Joe attributes some of his success to luck, some to being in the right place and some to being consistent. After shifting degree programs three-quarters out of college, he ended up taking any job he could due to the massive-scale layoffs in his field. Eventually, he became a buyer in a chemical company, which opened a lot of doors for the young upstart.

Doing the Work to Produce the Results

A mentor’s advice on being part of what’s most important to the executive team guided Joe. So even as a young man and up-and-comer, whatever the task was, he took it seriously and delivered. Soon enough, his efforts paid off and resulted in his being fast-tracked, a chance to build his career to greater heights.

Be Curious

Joe has always wondered why younger people tend leave their curiosities unsatisfied. He is someone who’s always curious and has a knack of driving people into a corner with his queries. This curiosity didn’t land him the “corporate training” that most young people would undergo, but he got to learn from the people at the grassroots of the company, and this helped him achieve many great things.

Some people like Joe live a life that isn’t all that straightforward. However, they are able to make legends of themselves by putting in a lot of hard work, effort, and curiosity.

Bio:

Joe Morgan is the founder and CEO of siY, LLC. This is a middle-market consulting firm focused on helping leaders with transformative change, cultural development, and go-to-market strategy.   

Having spent his career serving as a CEO or Member of the Board for large public as well as start-up and growth companies. Joe brings a wealth of experience and demonstrated leadership in transformational business environments.  

He has been successful in driving value and achieving strategic growth objectives in many industry sectors. These include service, technology, and manufacturing.

Joe’s experience includes having served as the CEO and Board member of Standard Register, a $1B+ public company, and recognized leader in the management of mission-critical communications for various sectors, including health care, financial services and manufacturing.  

He also served as Chairman and CEO of Uniguest, the leading provider and trusted integration partner of secure managed technology solutions with focus in hospitality and business services; Chairman and President of Sony Chemicals, a leader in specialized coatings for the automatic identification and electronics market; and President and Board Member of eflatbed.com, an on-line marketplace for transportation.

Additionally, Joe is on the Executive Advisory Board for NexPhase Capital, a private equity investment firm focused on middle-market companies.   He also serves on the Boards of Lion Group, OmniSYS, Heapy Engineering, JBM Envelope Company and Mary Queen of Angels Eldercare.

He serves on an advisory capacity at CURA Homecare, and is on the advisory board for WPI Life Sciences.

Joe is frequently called upon as a speaker and lecturer.

Links:

http://safeinspiredyou.com

https://twitter.com/safeinspiredyou

https://www.linkedin.com/in/joe-morgan-0311b51/

We hope you enjoyed Joe Morgan on this episode of Legends and Losers! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!

198 David Cancel Engineer to CEO

David Cancel, Engineer to CEO Legends and Losers

David Cancel is the co-founder and CEO of Drift, one of the fastest growing companies in the marketing space. A former engineer, he’s also a podcaster and author. Today he joins Christopher Lochhead to talk about building massive technological startups, sabbaticals, books, and why conversational marketing is the future.

“For me myself, engineer to tech to product to now, CEO… they’re kinda like a progression of the same thing… It’s like I’m trying to create our own world.” – David Cancel

Three Things We Learned

  • Anxiety-ridden break
When they first put up Drift, David and his team figured to create a tradition of taking a sabbatical every three years. But his turn to take a temporary leave from work came with the worst possible timing. His wife pointed out the fact that if he didn’t do it now, no one in the company was going to follow through, and so with tons of anxiety, he cashed in on the leave.
  • Pulling off a sabbatical with a great team
While his learning sabbatical offered lots of time to meditate and examine his life and willingly be at the beck and call of his daughter, some things broke. They were nothing he couldn’t fix though. He had his management team whom he could lean on while he set an example for all of Drift’s 190 and some employees to thank for that.
  • A startup faster than a rocket ship

Prior to Drift, David was the Chief Products Officer at Hubspot, another hugely successful company. The culmination of his experience from being part of large-scale bodies aided in growing Drift. And now his business is doing amazing, faster than any other company within and without their category.

Building a startup is one tough endeavor. Growing one is even more difficult because then you will have to learn how to brake and not implode. But with a team behind him willing to stay true to their visions from the get-go—sabbaticals included—, David thinks they can do it all.

Bio:

David Cancel is a serial entrepreneur, podcast host (Seeking Wisdom) and angel investor/advisor.

Best known for creating hypergrowth companies, products and product teams at companies such as Drift.com, HubSpot, Performable, Ghostery and Compete.

David has been featured by media outlets such as The New York Times, Forbes, Fortune, Wired and Fast Company. David has guest lectured on entrepreneurship at Harvard, Harvard Business School, MIT, MIT’s Sloan School of Management, Bentley and other Universities.

His popular blog davidcancel.com has been read by 1M+ entrepreneurs, and his Twitter account @dcancel has 180k followers and is considered a “Must-Follow” account for entrepreneurs, executives and product people.
Links:

188: Ann Miura Ko Most Powerful Women in Startups

Why is voice an important part of one’s future? How do we develop a sense of both individuality and community? In today’s episode, Ann Miura Ko joins Christopher Lochhead to have a free-ranging conversation from being a mom, growing up an immigrant, and her eventual success that started with being a loser.

“I don’t know which end I value more, but ultimately I love the creativity of a society like ours more than having people look over my shoulder all the time.” – Ann Miura Ko

Three Things We Learned

    Most public goods are things we don’t enjoy

This is mostly thanks to how humans treat public property. There’s a view that when autonomous vehicles become a hit, people wouldn’t have any real need to own private cars anymore. This leads to the question of whether we as humans would be able to stick to the moral duty of maintaining public goods without an actual, breathing person in the loop.

    Japan is the prime example of living as a community

Ann is the daughter of two Japanese immigrants. Growing up, she would come to Japan and every single time, she ended up struck by the strong sense of community of the Japanese. People take care of public property and keep things clean and orderly for everyone’s benefit and make sure everyone hold the same standards of living.

    Community or individuality

Having someone watch your every move and breathe down your neck can be very oppressive in a sense, but so is the strong pursuit for freedom and freedom only. A strong sense of community can prevent people from doing something detrimental to the larger populace. But people also achieve happiness by embracing their individuality.

Striking the balance of a sense of both community and individuality can be a quite the challenge. We have our social obligations to fulfill and we also have the personal mission to seek self-improvement in order to become successful at what we do. In fulfilling both our social and personal duties, however, we must remember that we can only truly develop character when no one is watching.

Bio:

Ann Miura-Ko has been called “the most powerful woman in startups” by Forbes and is a lecturer in entrepreneurship at Stanford.  

She’s the child of a rocket scientist at NASA, Ann is a Palo Alto native and has been steeped in technology startups from when she was a teenager. Prior to co-founding FLOODGATE, she worked at Charles River Ventures and McKinsey and Company.

Some of Ann’s investments include Lyft, Ayasdi, Xamarin, Refinery29, Chloe and Isabel, Maker Media, Wanelo, TaskRabbit, and Modcloth.

Ann is known for her debate skills  

She lives with her husband and 3 kids ages 8, 5 and 3.

Education: BS, Yale University (EE); PhD Stanford University (Math Modeling of Computer Security.)

Links:

http://floodgate.com

https://twitter.com/annimaniac