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035 Your Brand Will Be Defined By What You Do During Coronavirus

035 Your Brand Will Be Defined By What You Do During Coronavirus

Extraordinary times call for legendary leadership. In this episode, we talk about why your brand will be defined by what you do during coronavirus. This is a moment of truth. What leaders do in moments of truth define who they become and what happens to our brand.

“I think people are going to remember what you did or didn’t do during this crisis. How companies treat humanity during this crisis will have a long term impact.” – Christopher Lochhead

Focus on People

Christopher had been speaking with entrepreneurs about the discussions they should focus on to make a difference during this coronavirus crisis. First is: focus on people.

He shares about an Australian CEO who discussed with his people how they can make the most out of their cash on hand and accounts receivable. Half the people would rather get half of their salary than getting laid off.

“I think legendary leaders are open about these things and talk to the people about them. Try to do it in a way that is humane as possible and that extends your cash runway as possible.” – Christopher Lochhead

Focus on Customers

Now is the time to make a difference with customers. Christopher cites an entrepreneur who runs a gym. Rather than making a decision amongst him and his executive team, he asked their customers, if they want to cancel their subscription, do they want to pay half. A good 80 percent of their customers came back and said “we want to keep on paying you at the full rate.”

In addition, they’re doing a lot like what other legendary people in the health and wellness and fitness industry are doing, they are putting a lot of content on the internet.

“By being open real with people, they have endeared themselves to their customers in a very, very powerful way.“ – Christopher Lochhead

Focus on Humanity

What are we doing for humanity? Now is a great time to be radically generous. In fact, the company Dyson produced a new type of respirator in 10 days and have been supplying 15,000 for this pandemic fight. 

“We have to ask ourselves what do we have to contribute? It might be money, it might be other things. it might be expertise. In our case, we have a podcast to contribute, so we’re doing that.” – – Christopher Lochhead

To hear more about Christopher’s thoughts on how a company’s action during this crisis will affect their brands, download and listen to this episode. 

Bio:

Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.

He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.

Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.

In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.

He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.

Links:

James Dyson designed a new ventilator in 10 days. He’s making 15,000 for the pandemic fight

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter,Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content. 

034 Digital Leadership & Why Leaders Over-Communicate

034 Digital Leadership & Why Leaders Over-Communicate

Extraordinary times call for legendary leadership. Because of the Coronavirus, shit is getting very weird. As Hunter Thompson said, “When the going gets weird, the weird turns pro” which is why it’s time to become a Digital Leader and over-communicate.

Primary Mode of Communication

In times of crisis, people need to both see and hear from their leaders. Former navy seal and former Chief of Staff for 4-star General Stanley McCrystal, Chris Fussell was on FYD episode 38 and he made a comment on digital leadership in an article he wrote on NY Times. 

He made a comment on “digital leadership and said “first, don’t hunker down. Second, demonstrate candor.” Christopher thinks this is good advice especially in times like this, the only way people are experiencing their leaders is digital.

“Going forward once we get through this crisis, it is very clear, digital communication will become, if it is not already, the primary way that your employees hear from you and see you.” – Christopher Lochhead

Leaders Are Not Overcommunicating

Christopher observed that CEOs, CMOs or any business leaders at the moment are not communicating much. This to him is a big mistake. He shares that Fussel and McCrystal are right on, from a tactical point of view. He also encourages leaders, not only to improve public speaking skills but to get comfortable with technology such as Zoom. 

“I don’t think you can be a leader anymore unless you’re a digital leader.” – Christopher Lochhead

To cite an example, Chris Fussel talked about McChrystal doing daily briefings. He couldn’t take a top-down approach on communications that he needed to be front and center with all of his people and so he started daily briefings using video and audio.

Becoming a Digital Leader

As a CEO, CMO, of business leader the first a-ha here is that you can’t be a leader unless you’re a digital leader. Since its the only way for people to experience you, you must get comfortable with technology. Make the necessary upgrades on your hardware such as microphone, camera, among others. 

Consider having daily CEO briefings. Learn how to motivate your employees and ask the tough questions. Be radically candid and keep in mind, LISTEN, LISTEN, LISTEN. 

To hear more about Christopher’s thoughts digital leadership and overcommunicating. download and listen to this episode. 

Bio:

Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.

He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.

Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.

In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.

He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.

Links:

What 9/11 Taught Us About Leadership in a Crisis, NY Times

Radical Candor

Using the Next Recession to Change the Game

How to Survive a Recession and Thrive Afterward, HBR

Roaring Out of Recession, HBR

Seize Advantage in a Downturn, HBR

Advantage In Adversity: Winning The Next Downturn

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content. 

033 Marketing Is The Leadership Department

033 Marketing Is The Leadership Department

Coronavirus has created and is still creating both horrible human and economic costs, around the world. However, it is during these times, where real leaders stand up and become legendary. Extra-ordinary times, call for legendary leadership.

The difference in marketing can make in these tough times, is incalculable. In this episode, let’s talk about why Marketing is the Leadership Department. The goal is to share ideas but most importantly, to spark dialogue and thinking amongst you and your colleagues,

Let’s Face It

Let’s state the obvious. We are likely heading into a downturn: revenues are likely coming down, as well as budgets and spending. Both private and public enterprises are definitely affected.

“From a human perspective, the coronavirus is going to cause more loss and suffering that’s just where we are at.” – Christopher Lochhead

Marketing as Leaders

As this is the perfect time for marketing leaders to stand up, here are some of Christopher’s thoughts on how to make  it legendary.

1) Real leaders stand up

If you’re a CEO, please think about leading your company and your category through marketing. If you’re a CMO, please think about yourself as the personal press secretary for your CEO. In challenging times, the CEO and CMO want to be stapled to each other because marketing sets the tone for the company

“Marketing unifies all communications and spokespeople.” – Christopher Lochhead

On the offensive side, legendary marketing in bad times can drive the agenda for the category and position the company to gain a meaningful category share.

2) Now is a good time to do some good

If you or your company is in a position to help, see if you can. Let’s all try and be kind to each other. This is the right time to ask ourselves if we’re doing all that we can for our people. This epidemic is going to affect us in one way or another.

“I know of several high-profile Silicon Valley tech companies that are donating technology, money and/or resources, of one sort or another to try and help with this situation.” – Christopher Lochhead

3) Look to make smart budget cuts / re-allocations

Use this situation as an excuse to stop doing any activities that don’t give returns to the company. Most marketing plans have at least 20% of stupid in them. Cut more than you think you have to. Measure twice, cut once.

4) Practice radical transparency

Now is the time for clear, plain decisive language with your people, customers, partners, and investors. It is attractive, endearing and it makes people want to help this troubled company because the most legendary leaders are radically transparent.

5) Get thoughtfully aggressive

Research from Firms like McKinsey and Bain, published in places like the HBR suggest that the pathway to success is “Act fast, make changes or cuts if needed, then be thoughtfully aggressive, ahead of the recovery. The research says: Between 9%-14% of companies (depending on the study) actually outperformed competitors by at least 10% in sales and profit growth

Aim to be one of them!

6) Evangelize the category

Evangelize the problem. Most of your competitors will cut big M, marketing and over-focus on “demand generation.” That will open the door for you to grab category, POV leadership, We are all focusing on demand generation right now. That will probably open the door,  

“CEOs often say to me, ‘Our problem is we are too much of a vitamin, not enough of an aspirin’ In downtimes, you want to make sure that people think that your category is a must-have, not a nice to have” – Christopher Lochhead

7) Drive short-term revenue

Get your 5 smartest marketers and your 5 smartest salespeople in a room for a day. Brain storm short term campaign ideas. Pick the simplest, quickest to execute ideas and get busy driving the pipeline and the cash register

To hear more about Christopher’s thoughts on why marketing is the leadership department, download and listen this episode. 

Bio:

Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.

He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.

Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.

In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.

He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.

Links:

Using the Next Recession to Change the Game

How to Survive a Recession and Thrive Afterward

Roaring Out of Recession

Seize Advantage in a Downturn

ADVANTAGE IN ADVERSITY: WINNING THE NEXT DOWNTURN

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content. 

032 Want to do Legendary Marketing? Learn to Sell!

032 Want to do legendary marketing? learn to sell!

Did you know, one of the top reasons why CMOs and marketing leaders get fired is: the sales force thinks they are a joke. In this episode, we talk about why it is important for marketers to become great at sales.

Marketing Is Sales Scaled

If you think about what marketing is, it is actually selling at scale. Christopher thinks that in 30 to 90 seconds, a marketer should be able to lay down a point of view that captures the imagination of the audience. If you can’t, you have a serious “sales” issue.

“I think, as counterintuitive as this might sound, the number one skill set required to be legendary at marketing, is to have a black belt in sales.” – Christopher Lochhead

Spend Time in The Field

Christopher thinks that as a marketer, you should spend a disproportionate amount of time in the field. If you spend time with customers, you get a pulse on their problems and what opportunities are out there. 

“When you spend a lot of time in the field, the needs of the category sort of get into your bones, into your soul. It also enables you to have more empathy for both customers and your sales organization.” – Christopher Lochhead

Train and Set Goals

As important as getting adequate sales traning and gathering first hand information, marketers should also set a goal to become a requested person during sales calls. This means that you get the approval and respect of the sales force, which in turn means you are a legendary marketer. 

To add, Christopher provided mentioned The Ziglar Show Podcast (Kevin Miller), The Brutal Truth about Sales & Selling (Brian Burns) and book What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School (Mark McCormack), as great resources to improve your marketing skills. 

Bio:

Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.

He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.

Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.

In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.

He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content. 

031 8 Stages of Digital Marketing w/ Ryan Deiss

8 Stages of Digital Marketing w/ Ryan Deiss

In this episode, we have a thoughtful conversation about how to turbocharge your pipeline and drive revenue with Ryan Deiss, founder of DigitalMarketer.com. He has some provocative and engaging thoughts around what marketers can and should do to drive revenue today.

We talk about the 8 stages of digital marketing and common mistakes marketers do within these stages.

How To Get Attention

Ryan shares that other than creating substantial and valuable content, companies should advertise. Facebook and Google ads are his recommendations because it represents 86% of the total digital ad spent annually.

He also points out the importance of having the right offer, at the right time. 

“You have to do great content marketing and then you have to pay to get this great content, noticed.” – Ryan Deiss

8 Stages of Digital Marketing

One of the biggest problems companies do today is: they take a prospect too quickly from “interest” to “HEY BUY NOW.” Ryan teases out, exactly, what marketers need to do to own the whole process from interest to purchase and beyond.

The 8 stages of digital marketing are as follows:

Stage 1 – Awareness

Stage 2- Engagement

Stage 3 – Subscription

Stage 4 – Conversion

Stage 5 – Excitement

Stage 6 – Ascencion

Stage 7 – Advocacy

Stage 8 – Promotion

He discusses each on this episode with easy to digest, real-life examples.

Playing The Blame Game

Ryan also discusses the importance of owning these stages, as this is similar to the customer value journey. Most of the time, Marketing passes leads to Sales, which expects them to close the deal. Sales, on the other hand, know the importance of diligently following the stages and reverts back to Marketing.

He proposes that every company identifies what stage a certain lead is at and work their way around, encompassing other departments such as Product and Customer Care. 

“That is what it takes to win today. The companies that do it, they’re just gonna be the ones who will win and the ones who complain this is hard, they will lose.” – Ryan Deiss

To hear more about the 8 stages of digital marketing, download and listen to the episode.

Bio:

Ryan Deiss is a best selling author, founder of multiple companies collectively employing hundreds around the globe, and one of the most dynamic speakers on marketing in the United States today.

He is the founder and CEO of DigitalMarketer.com and Founder and Managing Partner of RivalBrands.com and plattr.com. Ryan is the creator of the “Customer Value Optimization” methodology and have introduced and popularized many of the digital selling strategies that modern companies now take for granted.

Additionally, he is also the founder and host of the Traffic & Conversion Summit, the largest digital marketing conversion conference in North America.

Links:

Linkedin: Ryan Deiss

Twitter: @ryandeiss

Digital Marketer

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content.

030 How To Make Marketing Decisions

030 How To Make Marketing Decisions

In this episode, let’s talk about the strategic lens required to make marketing decisions.

Marketing Decisions

Marketers, over and over again, continue to make this big mistake: they come up with marketing decisions without having a discussion around its context. Context, in terms of the “lens” they will use to come up with the decision. 

“If you’re a regular listener and if you know me, you know one of my favorite expressions is, thinking about thinking is the most important kind of thinking.” – Christopher Lochhead

Overly Simplistic Lens

When people go and make a decision, they have an implied assumption that everyone on their team are on the same page. This holds true in different types of teams, whether its a department or a board room discussion. 

In marketing, in particular, people use different kinds of lenses. Christopher points out that most people, even seniors executives, board members or giant public companies, use an overly simplistic lens in making a decision.

“Do I like it or do I not like it? Essentially the same lens that they use for naming a cat.” – Christopher Lochhead

Strategic Thinking

Christopher emphasizes that asking the questions whether you like something or not like something is just the same approach to naming a pet cat. This shouldn’t be done, especially when we’re talking about picking a category or designing a creative campaign or anything in between.

Hence, he is proposing the following lens when coming up with a marketing decision:

1) When you’re looking at any kind of marketing strategy or execution, ask, is this legendary?

2) Does this, execution, strategy or campaign enable us to design and dominate our category?

3) Does this decision drive near both term and long term revenue and customer loyalty?

To hear more about how to make marketing decisions, download and listen to the episode.

Bio:

Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.

He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.

Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.

In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.

He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content. 

029 Disagree and Commit

029 Disagree and Commit

Every big decision involves a group of people.and so, in business, if you’re going to do something legendary, whether its a strategy or a campaign, it will be a group decision.

In this episode, Christopher Lochhead shares why it is a legendary business trait to be able to get people to disagree and commit.

Everybody has a Marketing Opinion

Recently, Christopher had a discussion on with legendary tech executive Elisa Steele on Follow Your Different Episode 129. She talks about the power of being able to disagree and commit. She also talks about the importance of being a consensus builder.

“Getting people to disagree and commit is one of the most important skills an executive can have. Why? Because everyone has a Marketing Opinion.” – Christopher Lochhead

CMO’s get a lot of “HELP” from internal stakeholders. Debate, discussion, and disagreement are GOOD, when you are working on strategies, creative ideas, campaign ideas or category design. However, consensus is BAD.

“If everyone agrees, by definition it sucks. If someone isn’t scared, upset or at least concerned, it’s probably not legendary.” – Christopher Lochhead

How Do You Get In Front of This

Christopher advises that from the 1st meeting, tell the people involved the following:

1) we want to do something legendary

2) we want to generate legendary ideas/creative “ideation stage”

3) and when we decide, we are going to execute like “a pack of speedy, crazed wolverines:”

It is essential to lay upfront during the first meeting that the objective is not to please everybody but to create a strategic desition that will reap legendary results. It is also important to address who is the final decision maker.

Strategic Decision Over Consensus

Addressing these concerns from the very beginning will definitely receive negative responses from a lot of people, including some board members or senior executives. Christopher says that “this is okay.” We are aiming for strategic decisions, not consensus.

It would be nice to acknowledge that businesses need “feedback.” However, it would also be better to get everyone’s commitment that they will support and execute the final strategic decision. Be firm on expecting everybody to commit, even if they hate the decision or the direction taken. This trait would separate legendary leaders from the ordinary ones. 

To hear more about why it is a legendary trait to learn how to disagree and commit, download and listen to the episode.

Bio:

Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.

He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.

Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.

In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.

He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content. 

028 Is Your Marketing Plan Radical Enough?

028 Is Your Marketing Plan Radical Enough?

In this episode, Christopher Lochhead asks the question, “is your marketing plan radical enough?” Most marketing plans are predictable, uncreative and safe. He will share today how to do away with your usual marketing plan and craft a radical one.

3x CMO

Being an advisor to a lot of companies, Christopher shares how he has been part of creating, reviewing and critiquing a lot of these companies’ marketing plans. He further says that there are three things about these marketing plans: they are predictable, uncreative and safe. 

Safe as in, most CMOs are more concerned with making their “internal customers”  happy. The reason behind this is that most CMOs are trying to keep their jobs. Ultimately, this ends up in mundane marketing plans. 

“The longer I do this, the more I think that, if it’s legendary, its probably radical, at least in some way.” – Christopher Lochhead

3 Ideas For Radical Thinking

Our job, ultimately in business is to be a leader, who enables our company to design and dominate a giant category that matters. The goal is to earn 2/3rds of the economics in a space that we created.

“That in my opinion that, is the real job of the CMO, CEO and the entire C-suite. So I urge you when building or evaluating a marketing plan, ask yourself: Will this plan enable us to design and dominate a giant category that matters?” – Christopher Lochhead

The second idea is that, do we have a radical way to evangelize our category POV?

Legends market the category, not the brand but this is one of the common mistakes marketing leaders make.

“You want them to buy into the thinking and to the language. and as they do that, they’ll see things the way you do and your new way or different way of doing things will become the defacto standard. What you’re really creating is this fear of missing out” – Christopher Lochhead

Lastly, ask yourself: what’s a radical way to generate leads and drive revenue? Legendary CMOs design the category for the mid-long term and drive revenue in the “ASAP, right now” term.

3 Questions

Again, to recap, here are the three radical ideas to consider before creating a marketing plan. 

1) Will this plan, enable us to design and dominate a giant category that matters?

2) Do we have a radical way to evangelize our category POV?

3) What’s a radical way to generate leads and drive revenue?

To hear more about creating a radical marketing plan, download and listen to the episode.

Bio:

Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.

He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.

Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.

In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.

He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content.

027 How To Create a New Category & Brand w/ Carrie Palin, CMO of $20B Splunk

027 How To Create a New Category & Brand w/ Carrie Palin, CMO of $20B Splunk

This special episode of Lochhead on Marketing is the actual conversation of Christopher Lochhead and Carrie Palin, CMO of software company Splunk, during their appearance at Hypergrowth San Francisco.

Carrie shares how she spearheaded the category creation of Data to Everything and brand re-launch of Splunk.

Splunk at Hypergrowth

Christopher Lochhead and Splunk CMO Carrie Palin were invited to speak at Hypergrowth San Francisco to talk about creating a new category and brand. Drift organized this awesome business and marketing conference. This conversation is a rare opportunity to go behind the scenes of a very successful, super high-growth company like Splunk.

“At Splunk, we’re very proud of our culture. We’re very proud of our history. There’s something we call Splunkiness.” – Carrie Palin

Splunk is a publicly-traded software company worth $20B and they have recently launched a new category called Data to Everything. They have also relaunched their brand, changing their logo from green and black to orange and pink. 

Rough Start

Carrie shared that her forte is in demand generation and she found category creation and branding to be quite challenging. She notes that aside from having a great branding team, she had great bosses who believed in her vision.

It was a rough start for Carrie, as three days into her new role, she received a piece of unfortunate news about her ailing father. It was one of the challenging events of her life but she acknowledged that Splunk CEO and President had been supportive of her grief.

“Splunk stuck with me. They treated me like I’ve been there 20 years versus 3 days. Four months after that, it was crazier than I ever anticipated. Now that was through that, I know that it was absolutely the right place for me to be.” – Carrie Palin

On-boarding the BOD

Carrie shared amazing stories on how she on-boarded the Board of Directors with her ideas. She gave a lot of weight on conviction and commitment to the Board. 

“Listen to your data. Turn your data into doing, which is exactly what our clients are doing. They’re doing really incredible things.” – Carrie Palin

To hear more about How To Create a New Category & Brand w/ Carrie Palin, CMO of $20B Splunk, download and listen to the episode.

Bio:

Carrie Palin has been Splunk’s Senior Vice President, Chief Marketing Officer since 2019.

Prior, Ms. Palin served as the Chief Marketing Officer at SendGrid, a digital communications platform company acquired by Twilio, from 2018 to 2019.

From 2016 to 2018, Ms. Palin served as the first Chief Marketing Officer and Senior Vice President at Box, a cloud content management company.

Ms. Palin served as the Vice President of Marketing for IBM’s Cloud Data Services and Analytics Software Division from 2015 to 2016.

She also previously spent over 15 years at Dell leading various marketing organizations. Ms. Palin holds a B.S. Communications degree from Texas Christian University.

Links:

Twitter: @carriepsandstad

Linkedin: Carrie Palin

Splunk

Drift Hypergrowth

We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content.